New Year brings self-improvement


Resolutions can bring hope

By Carolyn Harmon - charmon@aimmedianetwork.com



The new year brings resolutions to light. Some seek fitness goals. Melissa Schlamb leads a Kinetic Strength class at the YMCA of Darke County’s Winter Fitness Preview, in Greenville, Ohio.


Carolyn Harmon | The Daily Advocate

GREENVILLE — The new year brings resolutions to light, and with them — hope for change.

The University of Scranton Journal of Clinical Psychology “New Years Resolution Statistics” published the top 10 resolutions in 2015, in order of rank: losing weight, getting organized, spending less, saving more, enjoying life to the fullest, staying fit and healthy, learning something exciting, quitting smoking, helping others fulfill their dreams, falling in love and spending more time with family.

The study revealed that 45 percent of Americans usually make resolutions and 38 percent never make them. A mere 8 percent show success in achieving their resolutions, with 24 percent failing. But all is not lost, as 49 percent have infrequent success. That does not mean they have all failed. The study also shows that 39 percent of people in their twenties achieve their resolutions, compared to 14 percent of those more than 50 that succeed.

What is the incentive for those resolutions? Some may be obvious, such as weight loss — if one is overweight, or brushing one’s teeth — if they are falling out. But others are more puzzling. Clinical Director for the Recovery & Wellness Centers of Midwest Ohio, Mental Health-Darke County, Vickie Martin, is a professional clinical counselor. Based on working with individuals in the counseling field for many years, she provides her insight on possible motivators for making resolutions.

“I like to think that people make resolutions because of the sense of renewed hope that things can be different after the New Year,” she said. “The new year brings new starts, and with it comes a burst of renewed desire to improve something. Some sustain what it takes to make those changes, while some don’t.”

Additionally, Martin said there is an increase of people requesting services right around the holidays for both mental health and substance abuse services.

“While the holidays may be difficult for those who have limited family/peer support, they are also a time when many decide to make changes, whether related to their substance use or their emotional stress,” Martin said. “I’m not sure if this has anything specifically to do with resolutions but more to do with that sense of hope that things can get better and that recovery is possible!” she said.

For those thinking about taking the step of seeking support and improving things for their emotional and behavioral health resolutions, call Recovery & Wellness Centers of Midwest Ohio at 937-423-3432.

The new year brings resolutions to light. Some seek fitness goals. Melissa Schlamb leads a Kinetic Strength class at the YMCA of Darke County’s Winter Fitness Preview, in Greenville, Ohio.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/34/2017/01/web1_resolutionsPRINT.jpgThe new year brings resolutions to light. Some seek fitness goals. Melissa Schlamb leads a Kinetic Strength class at the YMCA of Darke County’s Winter Fitness Preview, in Greenville, Ohio. Carolyn Harmon | The Daily Advocate
Resolutions can bring hope

By Carolyn Harmon

charmon@aimmedianetwork.com

The writer may be reached at 937-569-4354. Join the conversation and get updates on Facebook search Darke County Sports or Advocate 360. For more features online go to dailyadvocate.com.

The writer may be reached at 937-569-4354. Join the conversation and get updates on Facebook search Darke County Sports or Advocate 360. For more features online go to dailyadvocate.com.