Darke County court hears pleas on drug trafficking, sex offender registry


By Tony Baker - abaker@dailyadvocate.com



Eyvonne Fields, of Greenville, was initially charged with DUI, driving under suspension, and aggravated possession of fentanyl, a fifth-degree felony, but the first two charges were dismissed after Fields pointed out, and prosecutor Jesse Green confirmed, that she had in fact already been sentenced for the DUI, which itself resulted in her driving privileges being suspended. Fields then pleaded guilty to the possession charge, with her attorney, Randall Breaden, asking the judge for intervention in lieu of conviction in the case.

Eyvonne Fields, of Greenville, was initially charged with DUI, driving under suspension, and aggravated possession of fentanyl, a fifth-degree felony, but the first two charges were dismissed after Fields pointed out, and prosecutor Jesse Green confirmed, that she had in fact already been sentenced for the DUI, which itself resulted in her driving privileges being suspended. Fields then pleaded guilty to the possession charge, with her attorney, Randall Breaden, asking the judge for intervention in lieu of conviction in the case.


Tony Baker | The Daily Advocate

Kimberly Dillman, age 55, of Greenville was charged with three counts of aggravated trafficking in drugs, a fourth-degree felony.


Tony Baker | The Daily Advocate

DARKE COUNTY — Judge Jonathan P. Hein presided over cases involving drug trafficking, possession, and sex offender registry in Darke County Common Pleas court on Thursday.

Daryn Lucas, of Mendon, Ohio, was charged with failure to notify the court of a change of address, a third-degree felony. Lucas must register as a result of convictions for gross sexual imposition and sexual battery in Auglaize and Mercer Counties. Lucas, who claimed to be on medication for epilepsy and undergoing counseling for depression, entered a guilty plea. Judge Hein accepted the plea, and ordered a pre-sentence report from the Probation Department before delivering a sentence.

Amberly Williams, of Dayton, was convicted of trafficking in drugs and aggravated trafficking in drugs, and sentenced to serve 90 days in Darke County Jail, as well as to pay court, supervision, confinement, and other costs.

“Community control sanctions would be a waste of local resources given her prior lack of interest in rehabilitation,” Judge Hein stated in his written judgment on the case. “If she desires assistance, she may voluntarily appear at the Probation Department after release.”

Eyvonne Fields, of Greenville, was initially charged with DUI, driving under suspension, and aggravated possession of fentanyl, a fifth-degree felony, but the first two charges were dismissed after Fields pointed out, and prosecutor Jesse Green confirmed, that she had in fact already been sentenced for the DUI, which itself resulted in her driving privileges being suspended. Fields then pleaded guilty to the possession charge, with her attorney, Randall Breaden, asking the judge for intervention in lieu of conviction in the case.

“You can look at Eyvonne and tell she looks responsible, and she’s not stupid,” Breaden said of his client.

The prosecution concurred, stating they were “willing to give the defendant the chance to pull herself up by her bootstraps.”

Judge Hein then asked Fields about her plans for remaining sober after being released.

“I plan to stay in recovery, get a new sponsor, work the steps again, and spend a lot of time with my kids,” Fields said.

Judge Hein said these were good first steps, but counseled Fields to continue trying to examine the root causes of her drug use. He then sentenced Fields to pay restitution for lab fees and court costs, perform 100 hours of community service, and attend a treatment program that, if completed, would result in the charges against her being dismissed.

“You’ve got a lot going for you, including employment and a stable living situation,” Hein said. “But the dirty side of life can reach back up and grab you in one bad afternoon.”

Kimberly Dillman, age 55, of Greenville was charged with three counts of aggravated trafficking in drugs, a fourth-degree felony.

“The court is giving me a chance to redeem myself, make things right, and become a better citizen,” Dillman said when asked if she understood the terms of the plea. Dillman was sentenced to pursue treatment, pay court costs, and to seek part-time employment as conditions of her charges being dismissed.

Eyvonne Fields, of Greenville, was initially charged with DUI, driving under suspension, and aggravated possession of fentanyl, a fifth-degree felony, but the first two charges were dismissed after Fields pointed out, and prosecutor Jesse Green confirmed, that she had in fact already been sentenced for the DUI, which itself resulted in her driving privileges being suspended. Fields then pleaded guilty to the possession charge, with her attorney, Randall Breaden, asking the judge for intervention in lieu of conviction in the case.
https://www.dailyadvocate.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/34/2018/01/web1_20180104_130811-2.jpgEyvonne Fields, of Greenville, was initially charged with DUI, driving under suspension, and aggravated possession of fentanyl, a fifth-degree felony, but the first two charges were dismissed after Fields pointed out, and prosecutor Jesse Green confirmed, that she had in fact already been sentenced for the DUI, which itself resulted in her driving privileges being suspended. Fields then pleaded guilty to the possession charge, with her attorney, Randall Breaden, asking the judge for intervention in lieu of conviction in the case. Tony Baker | The Daily Advocate

Kimberly Dillman, age 55, of Greenville was charged with three counts of aggravated trafficking in drugs, a fourth-degree felony.
https://www.dailyadvocate.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/34/2018/01/web1_20180104_134650-2.jpgKimberly Dillman, age 55, of Greenville was charged with three counts of aggravated trafficking in drugs, a fourth-degree felony. Tony Baker | The Daily Advocate

By Tony Baker

abaker@dailyadvocate.com

The writer may be reached at 937-569-4315. To join the conversation and get updates on Facebook, search Advocate 360. For more features online, go to dailyadvocate.com

The writer may be reached at 937-569-4315. To join the conversation and get updates on Facebook, search Advocate 360. For more features online, go to dailyadvocate.com

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