Edison State Darke County students continue service to the community


The Edison State Darke County Fundamentals of Communications students made a drug abuse presentation at the Greenville Public Library. The students were (l-r) Kathryn Combs, Morgan Sparks, Autaum Moore, Josh Schrock and Jackson Plush.

The Edison State Darke County Fundamentals of Communications students made a drug abuse presentation at the Greenville Public Library. The students were (l-r) Kathryn Combs, Morgan Sparks, Autaum Moore, Josh Schrock and Jackson Plush.


Courtesy photo

GREENVILLE – Edison State Community College Darke County communications students accumulated more than 2,000 hours of community service during their fall and spring 2017-18 semesters.

They made nine anti-bullying presentations, seven drug abuse presentations and helped provide more than 3,000 contact hours to Greenville students in Empowering Darke County Youth’s After School Tutoring Program.

Fundamentals of Communications students used a variety of service options to incorporate the learning tools they received in the classroom. The tools included sending, receiving and feedback, as well as understanding and promoting ethics, human diversity, teamwork, critical thinking and respect for learning.

In the fall, they made anti-bullying presentations to students in Ansonia, Mississinawa Valley and Greenville City school districts. In the spring, they made drug abuse presentations to Ansonia and Greenville students.

Edison State students were rated by the district teachers, receiving almost exclusively 9 or 10 out of 10, for content, audience interaction and presentation skills. They reached nearly 500 elementary and middle school students with their messages this year.

The Greenville Public Library also provided a forum for the students, starting with a presentation on literacy last summer, the bullying presentation last fall and the drug abuse presentation this spring. The drug abuse presentation was recorded and posted on the library’s Facebook page. It was watched live by 26 individuals and since then has been viewed 613 times.

In addition to the presentations, communications students worked with more than 115 Greenville kindergarten through eighth grade students who needed extra help with their academic skills. They participated through the Empowering Darke County Youth After School Program. Some students, who couldn’t work in this program due to scheduling conflicts, provided the same service to students in their home school districts.

“As a college, we are committed to serving our community in many ways,” said Chad Beanblossom, Edison State executive dean, Darke County Campus. “We appreciate the partnerships with our local school districts, the Greenville Public Library and Empowering Darke County Youth.”

“These are sharp kids,” communications instructor Bob Robinson said. “They put a lot of time and effort into learning the skills of research, public speaking and – especially – teamwork. They did great jobs!”

Robinson added he had 110 students in the fall and spring semesters… 95 of them participated in one or both community service options. The tutoring program has brought back former students since its inception in 2016. They simply want to help. One Edison State student, Jim Kildow, has accumulated more than 400 hours working with the Empowering programs.

“I am extremely proud of the work our students are doing in the community,” Beanblossom said. “These are valuable experiences that not only benefit the youth of Darke County, but Edison State students as well.”

The Edison State Darke County Fundamentals of Communications students made a drug abuse presentation at the Greenville Public Library. The students were (l-r) Kathryn Combs, Morgan Sparks, Autaum Moore, Josh Schrock and Jackson Plush.
https://www.dailyadvocate.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/34/2018/06/web1_Edison-WEB.jpgThe Edison State Darke County Fundamentals of Communications students made a drug abuse presentation at the Greenville Public Library. The students were (l-r) Kathryn Combs, Morgan Sparks, Autaum Moore, Josh Schrock and Jackson Plush. Courtesy photo