Darke County Park District hosts Project FeederWatch


Darke County Park District participates in Project FeederWatch every Tuesday and Wednesday. Observations from here in Darke County may be used in scientific journals and shared with ornithologists and bird lovers nationwide.

Darke County Park District participates in Project FeederWatch every Tuesday and Wednesday. Observations from here in Darke County may be used in scientific journals and shared with ornithologists and bird lovers nationwide.


Courtesy photo

DARKE COUNTY – Bird watchers can join the Darke County Park District and participate in Project FeederWatch every Tuesday and Wednesday from 9-11a.m.

FeederWatch is a unique citizen science program organized by Cornell University that studies winter bird populations. Observations from here in Darke County may be used in scientific journals and shared with ornithologists and bird lovers nationwide.

Everyone is welcome regardless of birding level. Bird watchers will gather inside the nature center at Shawnee Prairie Preserve (4267 State Route 502 West) and count the birds that visit the bird-feeding station. Individuals can drop in anytime on Tuesday or Wednesday during the above times to help with the project.

There will be warm drinks available for those enjoying nature from the comfort of an armchair on a cold winter’s day.

For more information on Project FeederWatch or to ask questions about any of the many other programs offered by the Darke County Park District, call the Nature Center at 937-548-0165.

Darke County Park District participates in Project FeederWatch every Tuesday and Wednesday. Observations from here in Darke County may be used in scientific journals and shared with ornithologists and bird lovers nationwide.
https://www.dailyadvocate.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/34/2018/11/web1_Red-shouldered-Hawk-WEB.jpgDarke County Park District participates in Project FeederWatch every Tuesday and Wednesday. Observations from here in Darke County may be used in scientific journals and shared with ornithologists and bird lovers nationwide. Courtesy photo