New Year’s superstitions. traditions


By Charlene Thornhill - Along the Garden Path



New Year’s Eve is a time of reflection and celebration. This is also the time when we tend to engage in age-old traditions and rituals, regardless of whether we consider ourselves to be superstitious or not. Some of these superstitions are fun while others are just weird. Do you have customs you do to ensure a year of good fortune?

Some customs people do are couples and singles alike pucker up at 12 a.m. New Year’s Day believing that kissing someone at midnight will result in a lavish love life all year long. According to those who practice this delightful custom, if you don’t get kissed, then you’ll have bad luck in love.

In the southern states, many people usher in the New Year with a plate of black-eyed peas, collard greens, and cornbread. Supposedly, the peas represent good luck and the greens represent money. The peas, often served over rice, can be seasoned with ham hock, bacon, onions, or salt and pepper. Regardless of how you make it, this is a long-lived Southern tradition that will leave you full and satisfied! At our house, we have mashed potatoes, sauerkraut and BBQ pork. We serve the sauerkraut on top of the mashed potatoes for a great taste.

Many believe that what you’re doing at either the stroke of midnight or on New Year’s Day will set the tone for what you’ll be doing all year. That means, if you’re partying, then you should expect to have a good time all year long. If you’re working out, then you’ll probably have a year of fitness.

New Year’s Eve gives us another reason to get dressed up and buy a new outfit. It is also believed that wearing something new on Jan. 1 will increase the likelihood that you will receive more new garments throughout the year.

Another superstition is placing a piece of money on the doorstep on New Year’s Eve, and bringing that money in one the stock strikes will ensure a year of bounty. Also, finding money on New Year’s Day is lucky if you spend the money on someone other than yourself.

Because the New Year represents a fresh new start, many spend Dec. 31 giving their home a good cleaning while getting rid of the trash and clutter.

It is believed that you’ll have good luck if the first person to walk into your home in the New Year is a good-looking man.

Some cultures believe that the worst thing to do on New Year’s is to cry because it will cause you to shed tears and feel sad for an entire year.

Ever wonder why people blow whistles and make noise when the clock strikes 12? This custom is rooted in the superstition that loud noise will ward off evil spirits and thoughts.

Right before the New Year, many people will pay outstanding bills and settle debts believing that doing so will grant them luck in their finances.

Regardless of what your customs are or what you do at New Years, may you have a safe New Years and the start of a great 2020.

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By Charlene Thornhill

Along the Garden Path

Charlene Thornhill is a volunteer citizen columnist, who serves The Daily Advocate readers weekly with her community column Along the Garden Path. She can be reached at chardonn@embarqmail.com. Viewpoints expressed in the article are the work of the author. The Daily Advocate does not endorse these viewpoints or the independent activities of the author.

Charlene Thornhill is a volunteer citizen columnist, who serves The Daily Advocate readers weekly with her community column Along the Garden Path. She can be reached at chardonn@embarqmail.com. Viewpoints expressed in the article are the work of the author. The Daily Advocate does not endorse these viewpoints or the independent activities of the author.