PARCC testing results

The preliminary results from last school year’s PARCC math and language arts examinations are in and things don’t look good for the common core. According to this preliminary data, only 35-40% of elementary and middle school students who took the online test passed.

By PARCC standards, students must meet or exceed expectations set from the common core. In an attempt to offset these poor results, the Ohio Department of Education has proposed aligning PARCC scores with the previous scale used for the Ohio Achievement Tests. This would mean that students who “approached expectations” would be considered proficient, thus passing the exam. Still, under this alternative scoring system, only 65-70% of Ohio’s students would pass.

With the release of these poor results, we see once again how wrong PARCC, and the common core, are for our children. These tests were time consuming, the standards unreasonable, and the rollout was riddled with technical problems. Instead of getting a true education, our students were burdened with the stresses of difficult standards and extended testing.

Considering all of the challenges PARCC and the common core have created for our students, we can see how necessary House Bill 7, safe harbor for students, truly is. Without HB 7, up to 65% of our students would be vulnerable because of a test that just wasn’t ready for prime time. Safe Harbor is shielding our children from these poor results and allowing them to move forward with their education.

Since the passage of the state budget, PARCC testing has been effectively banned in Ohio. This year, students will transition to exams by the American Institute for Research (AIR). These new AIR tests are far less time consuming and have already been used in Ohio to test science and social studies comprehension.

Even with safe harbor and the end of PARCC testing in Ohio, there is much more work to be done to eliminate common core. It is important that our children have access to the best education and, as we have clearly seen, common core does not offer that. As we continue to grapple with the education Ohio’s students receive, we must keep the best interests of our children at the forefront and ensure that they have a bright future ahead of them.

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This undated photo provided by the Ohio House of Representatives shows Rep. Jim Buchy. he Ohio House is expected to consider a bill that would shield the names of companies that provide the state with lethal injection drugs. Buchy is one of the bills sponsors. The bill is among several the House planned to vote on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014 as lawmakers finish work for the two-year legislative session. The Senate passed it last week. (AP Photo/Ohio House of Representatives)
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/34/2015/10/web1_18f02dca703f7e31680f6a70670044353.jpgThis undated photo provided by the Ohio House of Representatives shows Rep. Jim Buchy. he Ohio House is expected to consider a bill that would shield the names of companies that provide the state with lethal injection drugs. Buchy is one of the bills sponsors. The bill is among several the House planned to vote on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014 as lawmakers finish work for the two-year legislative session. The Senate passed it last week. (AP Photo/Ohio House of Representatives)

By Rep. Jim Buchy

Rep. Jim Buchy can be reached by emailing [email protected] or calling 614-446-6344. Viewpoints expressed in the article are the work of the author. The Daily Advocate does not endorse these viewpoints or the independent activities of the author.